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Ben F Meek III

Ben F Meek III

Experienced. Reliable. Practical.
  • Probate, Estate Planning, Real Estate Law ...
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Biography

I grew up in a small town in the desert of southwest Texas, earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature from Baylor University in 1981, a Master of Arts degree in English Literature from Pittsburg State University in 1986, and a Juris Doctor degree (J.D.) from Oklahoma City University School of Law in 1985.

I have been a member of the State Bar of Oklahoma since 1986 and have practiced law in Oklahoma in law firms practicing insurance defense, commercial litigation, employment and discrimination law, and commercial real estate. I am admitted to practice in all Courts in and for the State of Oklahoma as well as the U.S. District Courts for the Eastern, Northern, and Western Districts of Oklahoma, and the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

I have served as legal counsel to an affordable housing nonprofit that helps develop affordable assisted living and senior care centers, and I am a past member of the Board of Advisors of Turning Point Ministries, Inc., an affordable housing nonprofit serving Edmond, Oklahoma.

From 1996 to 1998 I was a Barrister member of the William J. Holloway American Inn of Court. I am a member of the Oklahoma Bar Association and its Estate Planning and Probate Section.

I now limit my practice to the areas of probate and ancillary probate, adult guardianship, trust and estate planning, elder law, real estate transactions, and business formation.

Education
Pittsburg State University
M.A. (1986) | English
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Oklahoma City University School of Law
J.D. (1985)
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Baylor University
B.A. (1981) | English
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Professional Experience
Sole Practitioner
Ben F Meek, III, Attorney at Law
Current
Professional Associations
Oklahoma Bar Association  # 11677
Member
Current
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Estate Planning, Probate, Trusts Section of Oklahoma Bar Association
- Current
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William J. Holloway American Inn of Court
Barrister Member
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Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
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U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma
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U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma
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U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma
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Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Guardianships and conservatorships are also a significant part of my practice.
Practice Areas
    Probate
    Probate Administration, Probate Litigation, Will Contests
    Estate Planning
    Guardianship & Conservatorship Estate Administration, Health Care Directives, Trusts, Wills
    Real Estate Law
    Commercial Real Estate, Condominiums, Easements, Eminent Domain, Homeowners Association, Land Use & Zoning, Mortgages, Neighbor Disputes, Residential Real Estate, Water Law
    Business Law
    Business Contracts, Business Dissolution, Business Finance, Business Formation, Business Litigation, Franchising, Mergers & Acquisitions, Partnership & Shareholder Disputes
    Elder Law
Additional Practice Areas
  • Guardianship
  • Nonprofits
  • Business Formation
  • Ancillary Probate
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Legal Answers
Q. How do I transfer my deceased mother's vehicle out of her name in KY? She had no will and I'm her next of kin (daughter)
A: Most states have what are called "small estate affidavits" or "affidavits of heirship" or similar. If you qualify to use them, they can help avoid having to file a probate case with the courts. Generally, you have to be an heir of the owner that has died, no probate or intestate estate proceedings filed anywhere for the decedent, and you can list all of the heirs and their last known addresses. Usually there is a cap on the value the affidavit can be used for. Contact an experienced probate lawyer in your state for details and possibly forms. You might also contact your state's Bar Association for forms and information. Good luck.
Q. My boyfriend's mother died with no will, his grandparents took the deed and the death certificate. What can he do?
A: If mom died single (unmarried), the grandparents most likely have no right to the property they are taking. Your boyfriend and his siblings, if any, would be the mom's heirs but the grandparents would not. Taking possession of a deed that has been recorded in the land records would not affect the title to the property. If they took possession of an original deed that has not been recorded, that is a different matter. (Check the land records of the county where the property is to see if the deed was recorded.) Your boyfriend should speak to an experienced probate lawyer near him to get specific advice about his rights. Many lawyers have free initial consultations. Justia.com can help you find one nearby. Good luck.
Q. What can my mom do about money she is entitled to in my grandma’s will when my aunt had a joint account with my grandma?
A: Unfortunately, the money in the joint account likely ceased to belong to your grandmother when she died leaving a surviving joint owner on the account. However, if your grandmother lacked the mental capacity to understand what she was doing in setting up that account or in transferring funds into it, you might have legal grounds to require the aunt to pay those funds back to your grandmother's estate. The funds would then be distributed to your grandmother's heirs (if she had no will) or to her devisees (if she did). Also, depending on state law where the joint account was set up (or possibly the bank's joint account agreement), the joint account may not include a right of survivorship -- the right that a "joint tenant" has that gives them ownership of the joint property when the other joint owner dies. If grandmother, in setting up that account, added the aunt's name to the account merely as an accommodation -- to write checks for grandmother's bills, etc. -- but did not intend to convey survivorship to your aunt, those funds may legally belong to grandmother's estate. Talk to an experienced probate lawyer in your state to discuss the specifics of your situation and find out your rights and remedies. Best wishes.
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Ben Meek, Attorney at Law
Contact & Map
Landmark Towers West
3555 NW 58th Street
Suite 1000
Oklahoma City, OK 73112
Telephone: (405) 943-6650 Ext. 307
Fax: (405) 943-6655
Monday: 9 AM - 5:30 PM
Tuesday: 9 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday: 9 AM - 5:30 PM
Thursday: 9 AM - 5:30 PM (Today)
Friday: 9 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed