Nicole Betts

Nicole Betts

  • Elder Law, Estate Planning
  • Washington
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Biography

Nicole received Bachelor’s degrees in Political Science, Sociology, and Interdisciplinary Studies from Central Washington University. She received her law degree from Seattle University.

Her practice area focuses on estate planning, trust administration, probate, estate matters, and long-term care insurance appeals. She is committed to helping elders, and enjoys the complex and challenging cases involved in this field.

Nicole enjoys kayaking and being outdoors. She has a passion for animals as exhibited by her commitment to rescuing and fostering animals in need.

Education:

Seattle University School of Law, Bar Admission: Washington

Central Washington University: BS in Political Science, BA in Sociology, BS in Interdisciplinary Studies

Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Washington
Washington State Bar Association
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Practice Areas
Elder Law
Estate Planning
Guardianship & Conservatorship Estate Administration, Health Care Directives, Trusts, Wills
Legal Answers
Q. I had a will, power of attorney, health directive, property directive - all of it - drawn up in 2008.
A: Hi There,

I am always slightly concerned in dealing with dated documents. Particularly the Power of Attorney and Health Care Directive. The Uniform Power of Attorney Act came into effect in 2017 - as such, I often recommend that these documents be updated. However, of course, an attorney would have to review your particular documents to determine whether or not they are adequate.
Q. My sister is dying very quickly and she wants to give her house to her son. She has no will. Is there something we can
A: Hi there,

I would recommend that she have a call with an attorney. However, the laws of intestacy - or what happens when someone dies without a Will, may be helpful depending on her particular situation. If your sister is not married, then the house will be distributed to her children/child. The next question, of course, is whether her son is her only child. If there are multiple children, then a Will, transfer on death deed, or quit claim deed could be used.
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Salish Elder Law
Blog
Salish Elder Law - Elder Law & Estate Planning
Contact & Map
Salish Elder Law
144 Railroad Ave. Suite 211
Edmonds, WA 98020
Telephone: (425) 492-7212
Monday: 9 AM - 5 PM
Tuesday: 9 AM - 5 PM (Today)
Wednesday: 9 AM - 5 PM
Thursday: 9 AM - 5 PM
Friday: 9 AM - 5 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed